Untitled Document
  
Borden
 

Borden, Ss Peter & Paul


Photo:

  • 8 bells hung for full circle ringing
  • Tenor: 22 cwt approx. in E♭.
  • Grid Ref: TQ882629
  • Rung from: Upstairs Ringing Room
  • Frame: 1803 Thomas Sweetlove, made of timber
  • Diocese: Canterbury
  • Building Listed Grade: I. Click for Heritage details.
  • Peals rung at the tower

Details of the Bells

Bell Weight
(most recent)
Diameter Note Date Founder Retuned
Tenor 22 cwt approx.50" E♭ 1802 Thomas Mears I, Whitechapel Never
7 15 cwt approx.45" F 1802 Thomas Mears I, Whitechapel Never
6 12 cwt approx.41" G 1802 Thomas Mears I, Whitechapel Never
5 10½ cwt approx39½" A♭ 1802 Thomas Mears I, Whitechapel Never
4 8¾ cwt approx36½" B♭ 1802 Thomas Mears I, Whitechapel Never
3 7½ cwt approx33½" C 1802 Thomas Mears I, Whitechapel Never
2 6½ cwt approx32" D 1802 Thomas Mears I, Whitechapel Never
Treble 6 cwt approx.31" E♭ 1802 Thomas Mears I, Whitechapel Never

Inscriptions

Prior to 1802

Bell Weight
(most recent)
Diameter Note Date Founder Retuned Fate
1UnknownNeverRecast in 1802
2UnknownNeverRecast in 1802
3UnknownNeverRecast in 1802
4UnknownNeverRecast in 1802
5UnknownNeverRecast in 1802
6UnknownNeverRecast in 1802

History

1798 Record of 6 bells in the tower. [1]
1802 A new ring of 8 cast by Thomas Mears from the metal of the old 6. [2]
c 1886 The bells were rehung with new gudgeons, wheels and bearings, and 6 were quarter turned by Samuel Snelling of Sittingbourne. His bearings are still there and are possibly the last suriving examples of his work on change ringing bells. The old clock (date 1615) was replaced by Smith & Sons of Clerkenwell. [3]
[1] The church, which is dedicated to St. Peter and St. Paul, is a handsome building, consisting of three isles and three chancels, with a square tower at the west end of it, in which there is a clock, and six bells. It is built mostly of flint, but as a mark (The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent: Volume 6, Edward Hasted, 1798)
[2] The nineteenth century saw great changes in the appearance of the interior of the church and in the way in which services were conducted. Some of these innovations did not meet with the approval of the congregation, but the decision to recast the bells in 1802 would have been supported by all, expensive as it was. Borden had a strong ringing tradition. The Vestry met at the Maypole, in February, and agreed that the six bells should be recast as a peal of eight, hung in a new frame. The finance was to be raised in a numbers of ways. Mr Robert Matson, who then resided at Borden Hall, offered to give a sum equal “to what an assessment on the tithes would produce, supposing they were assessable”. No time was lost, for two weeks later the Vestry again adjourned from the church to reconvene in the convivial atmosphere of the Maypole to discuss with the London bell-founder, Mr Mears, the details of the casting and with Mr Sweetlove, the new frame. Mears, of the Whitechapel Bellfoundry where, fifty years later, the bells of Big Ben were cast, was to make “a good and musical peal of 8 at 4d. a pound and to find 8 new clappers at 10d. a pound.” He would allow 13d. a pound for the old metal if it should exceed the new, but be paid 17d. per pound if the new were to exceed the weight of the old. The founder himself would pay the costs of transporting to London by boat up the Swale and Thames. He would even allow money on the old clappers. A hundred pounds, which was half the agreed likely cost, would be paid when the bells were hung and then another instalment six months after and the final £30 one year after completion, with the bells insured by Mr Mears for that year. Doubtless feeling that they had struck a hard bargain, the Churchwardens and Overseers could then agree terms with Mr Sweetlove for making, supplying and erecting a frame of well-seasoned English oak. Sweetlove helped to take the bells down and he hung one bell for the temporary use of the parish. His charges amounted to £120 to be paid in instalments. It can be seen that all this amounded to a major outlay of parish funds and one which could not have been embarked upon without the fullest possible support. In August, 1802, William Wise, then one of the churchwardens, paid John Greensted 14/- for carrying the bells to Milton Quay in his cart. The following March, Greensted went to fetch the new ones. The Leeds ringers came and played the opening rounds or changes a week later. It was then decided there should be three official ringing days in the year, namely, the birthdays of the King, the Queen and the Prince of Wales. If there were to be a coronation, then that too would be celebrated by the bells. On each occasion, it was resolved, a total of eight shillings would be paid to the ringers. (A local history (tba))
[3] Towards the end of the [nineteenth] century, the bells were once again a cause for concern. It was found necessary to rehang and quarter them and to buy new bearings, gudgeons, stocks and wheels at a cost of £35. At the same time a deadening floor was to be fixed, complete with rope holes and the clock repaired and put back. The belfry was to be plastered. In all the cost was over £60. It was met, not as in former days by the patron, but by the offertory at Harvest Festival, £7-14-10d. together with the proceeds of a concert at Barrow School of more than £5, and the remainder, of over £50, by private subscription. The clock was coming to the end of its long and useful life, having been made in 1615. Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee in 1897 provided a fitting occasion for the erection of a new one and subscription list was opened. Forty people contributed, several giving a few pounds. The new clock was made an installed by Smith & Sons of Clerkenwell in the Spring of 1898; it cost £100 and by the time the carpenter and painter had been paid, the total cost of £117 had been met by the subscribers. (A local history (tba))

The belfry


The tenor.
Photo: Christopher J Cooper

The belfry.
Photo: Christopher J Cooper

One of the stamped Snelling bearings (they are all set in Plummer blocks and the brasses are all stamped thus).
Photo: Christopher J Cooper, 2017

Treble (quarter turned with new headstock, straps, gudgeons and bearings supplied & fitted by Snelling).
Photo: Christopher J Cooper, 2017

Second (quarter turned with new headstock, straps, gudgeons and bearings supplied & fitted by Snelling)
Photo: Christopher J Cooper, 2017

Third (quarter turned with new headstock, straps, gudgeons and bearings supplied & fitted by Snelling).
Photo: Christopher J Cooper, 2017

Fourth (quarter turned with new headstock, straps, gudgeons and bearings supplied & fitted by Snelling).
Photo: Christopher J Cooper, 2017

Fifth (quarter turned with new headstock, straps, gudgeons and bearings supplied & fitted by Snelling).
Photo: Christopher J Cooper, 2017

Sixth (quarter turned with new headstock, straps, gudgeons and bearings supplied & fitted by Snelling).
Photo: Christopher J Cooper, 2017

Seventh (original 1802 headstock and hand-made straps & nuts. New gudgeons & bearings, but bell never quarter turned).
Photo: Christopher J Cooper, 2017

Tenor (original 1802 headstock and hand-made straps & nuts. New gudgeons & bearings, but bell never quarter turned).
Photo: Christopher J Cooper, 2017

Peal Boards

Timber Performance Board dated 2016
22 Sept 1945: 5040 Double Norwich Court Bob Major
16 Jan 2016: 5008 Double Norwich Court Bob Major (70th anniversary of Fr Stanley Evans' first peal and farewell to the Vicar.)

Photo: Christopher J Cooper, 1 May 2017

Timber Performance Board dated 1929
29 Jun 1929: 5040 Grandsire Triples

Photo: Christopher J Cooper, 1 May 2017

Timber Performance Board dated 1897
06 Apr 1895: 5040 Grandsire Triples
13 Jan 1897: 5040 Union Triples

Photo: Christopher J Cooper, 1 May 2017

Timber Performance Board dated 1894
07 Apr 1894: 5040 Grandsire Triples
05 May 1894: 5040 Grandsire Triples

Photo: Christopher J Cooper, 1 May 2017

Timber Performance Board dated 1814
18 May 1812: 10080 Plain Bob Major
02 May 1812: 5440 Plain Bob Major
Dec 1812: 5376 Plain Bob Major
13 Jun 1812: 5120 Plain Bob Major
1812: 5040 Plain Bob Major
1812: 5040 Plain Bob Major
1812: 5040 Plain Bob Major
1812: 5040 Plain Bob Major
05 Apr 1813: 5760 Maidstone Bob Major (Felstead records say 4 Apr 1913)
06 Feb 1814: 5856 Plain Bob Major

Photo: Christopher J Cooper, 1 May 2017

Photo: Christopher J Cooper, 1 May 2017

Recent Peals
The most recent performances, according to BellBoard.
2016-01-165008 Double Norwich Court Bob Major
2004-04-245024 Spliced Surprise Major
Recent Quarter Peals
The most recent performances, according to BellBoard.
2017-05-031260 Grandsire Triples
2017-02-051260 Grandsire Doubles
2016-12-281280 Bristol Surprise Major
2016-11-121280 Bristol Surprise Major
2016-09-091260 Grandsire Triples
2016-05-141280 Cambridge Surprise Major
2016-02-261280 Superlative Surprise Major
2016-01-201280 Treble Bob Major In The Kent Variation
2014-07-121260 Grandsire Triples
2013-06-221320 Reverse Canterbury Pleasure Place Doubles
2013-06-081280 Kent Treble Bob Major
2009-07-191344 Plain Bob Major
2008-11-021260 Plain Bob Minor
2006-05-141260 Grandsire Triples
2003-09-131260 Plain Bob Doubles
Full list of peals here
Full list of quarters here

Love's Guide to the Church Bells of Kent Page updated: 28 May 2017